HOME OF THE SMALL AIRCRAFT


ABSTRACTS
 
 
COCKPIT SYSTEM DESIGN FOR GENERAL AVIATION FREE FLIGHT USING A COGNITIVE ENGINEERING APPROACH
Jie Rong, Yuanyuan Ding, and John Valasek
Texas A&M University, College Station, Texas 77843-3141
AIAA Paper 2003-5774

The realization of general aviation Free Flight requires advanced cockpit systems to assist pilots in managing information and decision-making. In this paper, the application of cognitive engineering concepts to cockpit system design for general aviation is discussed. The design of an Aircraft Approach and Landing Assistant is presented as an example of this method. Its purpose is to enhance pilot situational awareness, aid pilot decision-making, and reduce pilot workload during the approach and landing phase in an environment with complex weather, traffic and terrain conditions. The ongoing development of the system is based on the cognitive model of general aviation pilots. It is implemented into existing flight software and a real-time, pilot-in-the-loop flight simulation system is developed for its validation. The proposed approach appears to be a promising candidate for designing intelligent cockpit systems and decision-aiding tools for future general aviation Free Flight pilots.
DESIGN SHEET: AN ENVIRONMENT FOR FACILITATING FLEXIBLE TRADE STUDIES DURING CONCEPTUAL DESIGN
M. J. Buckley, K. W. Fertig, and D. E. Smith
Rockwell International Science Center, Palo Alto Laboratory
Palo Alto, CA 94301
AIAA Paper 1992-1191

This paper summarizes the capabilities of Design Sheet, a software program that facilitates trade studies during conceptual design. Design Sheet permits the designer to build a model for use in conceptual design by entering a set of algebraic equations in a very flexible form. The designer can then use Design Sheet to easily change the set of independent variables in the algebraic model, and to rapidly perform trade studies, optimization, and sensitivity analyses. The basic mathematics and algorithms used in Design Sheet are outlined. The functionality of Design Sheet is illustrated first with a simple example, and then with a more complex example involving initial aircraft sizing. For realistic conceptual design problems, it is argued that Design Sheet provides the capability to perform trade studies with significantly increased flexibility and efficiency.
GPS-BASED TERRAIN AVOIDANCE SYSTEMS - A SOLUTION FOR GENERAL AVIATION
Controlled Flight into Terrain
Jonathan Baldwin, Rick Cassell, Alexander Smith
Rannoch Corporation, Alexandria, VA

Of the 2,533 fatal general aviation (GA) accidents from 1982-1988, a total of 646 fatal accidents (nearly 26%) were attributed to controlled flight into terrain (CFIT). This category of accident was the single biggest cause of GA aircraft fatalities during this period. This paper discusses a concept for a low-cost GA Ground Proximity Warning System (GPWS) that can satisfy the operational requirements for avoiding CFIT incidents, thereby improving the utility and safety of GA flight activities. The results from this work are expected to validate the concept of operation, determine the functional and physical characteristics of the device, and validate the design through modeling and simulation. Assuming a successful conclusion to the concept validation stage, fabrication of a preliminary hardware prototype will also be initiated in preparation for flight testing. The device relies on two extensive databases and a GPS sensor to develop a low-cost GPWS designed specifically for the small, single engine, single pilot GA aircraft— referred to as the TWAS (Terrain Warning and Avoidance System).
AN INTEGRATED DECISION-MAKING METHOD TO IDENTIFY DESIGN REQUIREMENTS THROUGH AGENT-BASED SIMULATION FOR PERSONAL AIR VEHICLE SYSTEM
Jung-Ho Lewe, Byung-Ho Ahn, Daniel A. Delaurentis, Dimitri N. Mavris, Daniel P. Schrage
Aerospace Systems Design Laboratory
School of Aerospace Engineering
Georgia Institute of Technology
Atlanta, Georgia 30332-0150
AIAA Paper 2002-5876

A product's design requirements guide the next development efforts. Thus, correct decision-making is critical in generating design requirements as vehicle concepts are being formulated. A new method is proposed to account for system-of-systems aspects and to aid a decision-making process in synthesizing design requirements for a personal air vehicle system. The use of an agent-based modeling technique facilitates the abstraction of the key elements in the whole system. A traveling party is treated as an agent, and the infrastructure environment in the national transportation system is easily represented in the model. A number of simulations are performed to demonstrate the capability of this new approach. The method not only measures the effect of design requirements of a personal air vehicle system through sensitivity analyses, but also evaluates the effect of system technologies quantitatively, while maintaining the system-of-systems perspective. With this powerful method, designers can extract essential technical requirements that allow polishing of concept vehicles; policy makers can investigate the infrastructure and technology impact of new systems; and business planners can perform an analysis based on their own market assumptions.

[Back] to Homepage Updated: 23 November 2007
© 2004 - 2009 - aeroengineer.net